Workshop Schedule

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September 13th SPECIAL WAFER WORKSHOP

Presented by Nancy Miner and Sandra Tarbox

Space is limited so register soon. Fee $20

Come and spend a day testing wafer receipts and making fillings.

We’ll do a few waffles too.
Bring some containers to take wafers and filling home.

Pack a lunch and join in the fun.
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Following workshops: The registration fee per class is $ 65 per person.

  We starts at 10 and finishes about 3

September 27th — Boiled and Baked
We begin by stuffing a whole cabbage with force meat and boil it over the fire. Take a trip out to the herb garden to pick fresh greens for a boiled herb pudding. Bake flat bread on the hearth. Mix up and boil ingredients for a Yellow Flummery Pudding for a sweet side dish, served with Pine Tree Shillings.

October 18th — Savory and Sweet
Our savories will be Potted Beef, Oxford Sausage and Scotch eggs, with homemade vermicelli pudding and Carrot Puffs. Our meal will be accompanied by Maids of Honors, filled with a tasty and colorful assortment of preserves. And finishes with an early American beverage.

November 8th —They Ate That!
Pigeon, Cockscombs, Wiggs and Hedgehogs – OH MY! It’s not what it seems and this meal will be a treat, fun to make, share and converse about.

For more information, or to register, email sandie@colonialtable.com
Sandra Tarbox, Foodways Culinarian

Three Generations of Stirring the Pot

Just a few pictures from the Talk and Taste at the Moffat Ladd House Museum. Rice Pudding in Skins, Chewits, Preserved Green WalnutsDSC_5831Lafayette Cakes, Blancmange, Blackwell’s Pudding

DSC_6916Little Crackers, Gooseberry Preserve, Potted Ham, Oatmeal Candies

DSC_6917Display Table

DSC_6921Unmolding the Blancamange

DSC_6934Everyone happily digging in to the food. DSC_6940Sandie

TALK & TASTE

  ”Three Generations of Stirring the Pot,”

Wednesday August 6, 2014, 4PM
Experience the history of the Moffatt-Ladd House one nibble at a time with historic foodways culinarian and museum guide Sandra Tarbox.

Call (603) 430-7968 to reserve a spot, as space (and nibbles) are limited.

  $5 admission.

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OPEN HEARTH COOKING WORKSHOPS

FALL 2014       NEWMARKET, NH

Join us to prepare and eat savory and sweet dishes of the past on the open hearth.

These Hearth cooking workshops are fun and informative. Each class is different. You will learn to roast, bake, stir, and sizzle your way through the preparation of a traditional 17th -18th century meal using receipts from the past.  Enjoy the warmth of the hearth as you enjoy the fruits of your labor. 

September 13th   SPECIAL WAFER  & WAFFELS WORKSHOP  

Presented by Nancy Miller and Sandra Tarbox 

Come and spend a day testing wafer receipts and making fillings. We’ll do a few waffles too. Bring some containers to take wafers and filing home.  Pack a lunch and join in the fun.    Space is limited so register soon.  Fee $20

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Following workshops:  The registration fee per class is $  65 per person.

We starts at 10 and finishes about 3 

September 27th                Boiled and Baked

We begin by stuffing a whole cabbage with force meat and boil it over the fire.  Take a trip out to the herb garden to pick fresh greens for a boiled herb pudding. Bake flat bread on the hearth.  Mix up and boil ingredients for a Yellow Flummery Pudding for a sweet side dish, served with Pine Tree Shillings.  

October 18th   ­­­                Savory and Sweet

Our savories will be Potted Beef, Oxford Sausage and Scotch eggs, with homemade vermicelli pudding and Carrot Puffs. Our meal will be accompanied by Maids of Honors, filled with a tasty and colorful assortment of preserves. And finish with an Early American beverage. 

November 8th                   They Ate That!

Pigeon, Cockscombs, Wiggs and Hedgehogs  - OH MY!  It’s not what it seems and this meal will be a treat, fun to make, share and converse about. 

For more information, or to register, email sandie@colonialtable.com

Due to the number of registrations and or the availability of certain food items

 substitutions may be made to the menu.

 

 

 

JUST DESSERTS 3

Yes it has been awhile since our Just Dessert workshop. Sometimes modern life gets in the way of my 18th century life. However the workshop is still important to share. We had a very full day at the hearth and this should bring us to the last group of receipts we used.
Sue and Tracey tackled the White Pudding in skins by Elizabeth Raffald, The Experience House-keeper” 1769. The rice needed to be boiled in milk until soft. It was then strained.

Untitled-1 copyRinsing the skins is a very important gob, they are gritty and you need to wash both inside and out very well. This can be fun, much like water balloons.

Untitled-2 copyThe clean skins were placed on the funnel tip and the sweet rice mixture that was made into a stiff batter was added to the funnel. Tracey and Sue take turns using the sausage press and turning the skins into links.

3We only fried four links and they were very good I’ll do this again for myself. As for the rest, they were packed up to be taken home and fried for dessert.

Untitled 4 copy Next we played with the walnut mold. The dough was divided in half and cinnamon added to one part. This would become the brown shell. The rest was made into the nut inside.

Untitled 5 copy It made quite a few as you can see here.

Untitled-6Paul’s arm had a chance to rest from beating the cake batter for an hour so he wiped up the batter for the wafers.

Untitled-7 copyOnce again the batter just would not work. We managed to get a few but then gave up and I took out the ones I had from my last successful try.

Untitled8 copyLast but not least there was the syllabub from an anonymous manuscript of 1677, made with whipping cream, lemon peel grated, white wine, a touch of nutmeg and a sprig of rosemary.

Untitled-9copyThis was poured in jars and also taken home.

Untitled-10 copyI do hope everyone enjoyed taking the deserts home to share.

Sandie

“I’m not a vegetarian! I’m a dessertarian!”

Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes: Something Under the Bed is Drooling

SYMPOSIUM

Some pictures from the textile symposium in Maine

First we have the presenters, Faye Snyder, Edward Maeder, Karen Clancey and Sandra Tarbox
presenters

Some of our wonderful guests
guests

My indigo  shirt, Thanks to Karen
blue shirt

Sandie

PS: Ever since I updated to windows 7 the blog has been a mess so this is a test to see IF IT WILL WORK!!!!

 

 

JUST DESSERTS #1

Our dessert workshop day arrived and this would be a full day of making, baking and mixing. Everyone began with a receipt that would need some things to be prepared and readied for the bake kettle or oven.

This first blog is about Frogger Cookies, a Marblehead, Massachusetts, receipt made with peal ash, a Pound Cake receipt from Hannah Glass, and a Chocolate Tart receipt from The Whole Duty of a Woman, 1737, Guide to the Fair Sex, Virgins Wives or Widows.

In our workshop papers, I added the wonderful story about the Joe Frogger cookies, named for the patriot and tavern owner Joseph Brown of Marblehead. Heather quickly began the receipt and worked the molasses, rum and butter into the dry ingredients and rolled them out between parchment paper. The dough needed to sit in the refrigerator for two hours before she could cut them. The originals Froggers were an invention of Joe’s wife, Lucretia Brown, and were served in their tavern and sent by the barrelful off to sea with the merchant ships. If you wish to know more about the cookies, go online and you will find the whole delightful story.

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Heather picked a decorative tin mold to cut large cookies and put them on a greased tin sheet ready for the bake oven.

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The Hannah Glass Pound Cake receipt has a batter that needs to be beaten for an hour by hand. Paul, having the strongest arm and biggest hands, jumped right in and started off whipping the eggs and butter together.

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Following Hannah’s narrative receipt, he mixed the liquids with the dry and mixed and mixed and mixed, for a whole hour, by hand. This was hot work and we had to wipe his forehead once in a while.

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Thanks to Paul the batter was light and fluffy and Heather helped by buttering the patties pans and spooning the batter in. Paul deserved a rest.

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The bake oven had been heating for about two hours and, after being cleaned out, into it went the pound cake and Joe Froggers.

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For our chocolate tart, there were two receipts. One is for the chocolate, from The Whole Duty of a Woman, and one for a sugar paste crust, Charles Carter 1730. Tracey started by melting the American Heritage Chocolate, adding eggs, the rice flour and other ingredients and melted everything together over the coals on the hearth. It was important to stir often so the mixture would not burn. When ready, the chocolate was put to the side and the sugar paste made.

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All the desserts that were made in the workshop were going home, so the sugar paste, tart crust was placed in small patties pans.

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With the crust ready, Tracey filled them and baked them in the kettle. The tarts did not take long, and once they were brown, out they came.

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After six weeks my arm is healing, however I’m still typing with one hand. I will try and finish the Just Desserts blog with #2 soon. 

Enjoy the warm weather,

Sandie

Life is too short, eat dessert first.

Anonymous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Dessert

It’s a while since our last workshop, “JUST DESSERTS.” I haven’t posted as I went in for surgery two days later. Three weeks have passed, and I thought I would give you a peek of what we made.

On the table we displayed our desserts before they were all taken home to be enjoyed. Here you see the Joe Fogger molasses cookies made with pearl ash, Chocolate Tarts made with 18th century chocolate from Mills Co, Hannah Glasse’s Pound Cake that was whipped by hand for hours, a syllabub, a wonderful rice pudding stuffed into casings, wafer (only one came out), and molded walnuts.

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When I’m once again two-handed, I’ll share the full day of the workshop.

arm

Sandie

Look like I’ll be cooking with one hand tied behind my back

 

 

Day’s End

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that Allan has been a great help at the hearth.  Having a man around to lug wood and clean out the bake oven is huge!!  We all thank you, Allan.1

Allan is also a fount of knowledge when it comes to breathing new life into old rusted iron pots.  Here he shares with Cathy how he has gone about restoring my cooking pots and such.  It is time-consuming ,yet the end results are worth it. Cathy emailed me later to say her son was going to give it a go with her old pots.  We wish you much luck in finding the gold in an old pot.  It’s there it just takes time to find.1copyWith the meal at an end, everyone pitched in and helped to put things to right. I do appreciate this kindness and it gives us all a moment more to talk and share good books and websites and the like.2 copySandie

Keeping your space clean is as much part of the end result as the dish being tasty.

Carla Hall         ____________________________________________________

I’m not ending here as usual, as I’m going to share with you our Day’s End.

Allan and I had a very small pork loin ready for dinner that night.  The fire was still going and there was left over mushroom and artichoke cream, and scalloped potatoes.  This sounded like a good combination for our meal. Allan butterflied the pork, sautéed some mushrooms and add the rest of the Morels al la cream.  He spread this on the pork, and rolled it up, and tied it with a string.  He put a bit of oil in the skillet he had just cleaned, placed it over some coals and browned all the sides of the pork loin.   He then placed a lid on it and let it roast over the coals.4I took the potatoes and put them into the small bake oven to warm them, then tossed a salad together and we were all set for an easy, quick dinner.5yA perfect end to a great day,

Sandie

“My life really began when I married my husband.”

Nancy Reagan (me too)